At work on Venezuela, Iran and the future of Europe

At work on Venezuela, Iran and the future of Europe

I write at the end of a week that I spent in Latin America and the Balkans, at work on Venezuela and the future of Europe, but also on the nuclear deal with Iran. On Monday and Tuesday I was in Costa Rica, for the meeting of the International Contact Group on Venezuela. In a incredibly delicate moment for the country, marked by new violence, we confirmed that the only possible way out of the crisis is a peaceful and democratic solution. In our second day of work we welcomed the representatives on the Caribbean Community (Caricom), of Chile and the Holy See: we will continue to work with the rest of the international community to help restart a political process in the country. This is my speech opening the meeting, and here is the press conference.  During the week , together with the Contact Group, we also reacted to the arrest of Edgar Zambrano, vice-president of Venezuela’s National Assembly: here is our statement. The visit to Costa Rice was the opportunity to meet with President Carlos Alvarado Quesada and Foreign Minister Manuel Ventura Robles. From Costa Rica to Albania, for the summit of the Brdo-Brijuni process – the Balkan regional forum organised by Croatia and Slovenia. On top of bilateral meetings with our Albanian guests – Prime Minister Edi Rama and President Ilir Meta – I also met with Serbia’s President Aleksandar Vucic and Kosovo’s President Hashim Thaci, and with the Chairman of Bosnia’s Presidency Milorad Dodik. Here is the press conference with Edi Rama: I repeated that it is time to open negotiations for Albania’s accession to the European Union....
Back from the G7 in France

Back from the G7 in France

I write after coming back from Dinard, in France, where we held the annual meeting of the G7 Foreign Ministers. We dealt with the major international crises – Libya, first and foremost, calling for an end to the clashes and for the implementation of the action plan put forward by the United Nations. Then Syria, Yemen, Ukraine, Venezuela. The Israeli-Palesestinian conflict. Our relations with Iran. And more: we discussed how to fight inequalities – including between men and women, – how to support African peace operations, the role of women in peace processes, how to regulate States’ behaviours in cyber-space and to contrast disinformation, how to tackle together the issue of foreign terrorist fighters going back to their countries. Here are the communiques. The meeting was also an opportunity to meet one-on-one with the Foreign Ministers of Canada, Chrystia Freeland, and Japan, Taro Kono – two countries that share completely our support for multilateralism. My week had started in Brussels meeting a group of women mediators, who work to end conflicts in different parts of the world. Then at the headquarters of the European External Action Service, to inaugurate an exhibition on the European Satellite Centre’s work: together, we Europeans have some of the most advanced satellite systems in the world, which no Member State could afford alone. These technologies are essential for our security, for reacting to natural disasters, and for supporting our global partners. Last Wednesday I was at the Brussels Conference on food security – because food crises and desertification are already causing wars and tensions, and investing in a truly sustainable development is crucial for our...