A global alliance to protect the climate agreement

A global alliance to protect the climate agreement

The Paris agreement on climate was a collective assumption of responsibility towards our future. Between a petty interest and a long-term one, the industrialised economies and the developing ones – together – were far-sighted, for once, and tried to fight back against climate change. As we face natural disasters, humanitarian and economic crises, massive migratory flows provoked by climate change in different parts of the world, this deal is a true investment in our stability, security and sustainable development. For the whole planet. We, as the European Union, will not change course. On the contrary. Despite President Trump’s announcement that the United States are pulling out of the agreement, we remain determined to fully implement the deal. There is no doubt about this, and I told it to Vice-President Mike Pence when he called me, last night, to explain the US decision to the European Union. We carry on and we are not alone: we are building a global alliance to face a global challenge. For years now we have been building strong coalitions on the fight against climate change, with those countries and regions that share our resolve. With Latin America – as I could confirm during my visit to Chile and Argentina this week. With the African Union, and together we have just reaffirmed that cooperation on climate is a vital priority (here is the press release). And with China. We talked about this at length during the EU-China Summit in Brussels, yesterday and today. Beijing has restated its commitments and the resolve to engage on the international arena in support to the Paris deal – as well as in support of multilateralism. They will also...
Manchester’s sorrow, and our response

Manchester’s sorrow, and our response

A painful week ends, marked by the attack last Monday in Manchester. An attack against our youth, their desire to live, to be together, to have fun together. As a mother, I cannot help thinking of those families’ infinite sorrow. As European institutions, we immediately offered all our support to the UK, strengthening the exchange of information and cooperation among our intelligence services. But the strongest response lies in our willingness to keep on living. We look ahead with hope, “we don’t look back in anger” – this is what the people of Manchester said and sang, when they took on the streets to react together. We also talked about our cooperation against terrorism when we welcomed President Donald Trump to Brussels, on Thursday. He paid a visit to the European institutions during his first foreign trip as the US President, after Vice-President Mike Pence came here during the first month of the administration, and after the many meeting I had with Rex Tillerson, James Mattis, HR McMaster, Jason Greenblatt, Nikki Haley. The United States and the European Union continue to work together: on our shared priorities – from Syria to Ukraine – as well as on issues where our views differ – on these, too, our dialogue is open, and fruitful. This week we also welcomed Emmanuel Macron to Brussels, for the first time as French President. With him, and with Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian I discussed the common work ahead and how to relaunch and strengthen our European Union. Including on security and defence. And this last week marked an important step forward towards a European Union of security and defence. Together with...

In Washington, interviewed by Christiane Amanpour

"We've entered into a different phase of the relations between Europe and the United States," @FedericaMog tells me https://t.co/KK0pY9ILHK — Christiane Amanpour (@camanpour) 20 marzo...