At the UN general Assembly. Investing in multilateralism is our “national interest”

At the UN general Assembly. Investing in multilateralism is our “national interest”

I write after coming back from the United Nations’ General Assembly in New York: a full week at work to preserve the nuclear deal with Iran, to restart peace talks in Syria, to keep alive and relaunch the two-State solution for Israel and Palestine, to work with Africa on our future, to protect rights and create new opportunities for all. (I will write more on Iran, Syria and the Middle East in the next post). But first and foremost it was a week to restate that we will find solutions to the great issues of our times only if we work together, and the United Nations are the natural centre of gravity for all our collective work on peace, security and growth around the world. This week, some described the United Nations as an obstacle on the path to achieve our “national interests”. The exact opposite is true. In a complex and difficult word like ours, the only realistic and effective solutions are born when we join forces, among global powers and continents, in the framework of the United Nations. This is the European Union’s choice, the European way. We confirmed it in our meeting with the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, and in the one – that I convened for the first time ever – with the ministers of the European members of the UN Security Council. It is a choice that we put in practice every day. We do so, for instance, reinforcing trilateral cooperation among the European Union, the African Union and the United Nations – on migration, economic growth, peace and security (here is a report...
Why a meeting of Women Foreign Ministers

Why a meeting of Women Foreign Ministers

I write as I travel from Montreal to New York – where a very intense working week starts today, because of the United Nations’ General Assembly. Over the last two days in Montreal, Canada, we gathered the world’s Women Foreign Ministers for the first time in a long while, together with Canada’s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. When Chrystia and I had this idea, it was first and foremost because we realised, through our daily work, what a special contribution women bring to foreign policy, to peace negotiations, to national reconciliation processes. For this reason, during Montreal’s meeting we discussed the main international crises, from Syria to Ukraine, not only among Foreign Ministers but inviting other women who work to solve conflicts: we want to support them in their difficult – yet vital – work. But we also decided to hold this meeting to tell our stories to girls and women all around the world: we wanted to show that there are no jobs “for men only”, and that every girl has the right to do anything she wants with her life. We will continue to work together, in the coming weeks and with a new meeting next year. Here is my opening speech, here the final press conference. In Canada we also decided to remember a shooting from almost thirty years ago: fourteen young women were killed simply because they were women who dared to study, be bright and be free. Here is the video. My week started in Brussels, where we presented our Strategy to better connect Europe and Asia. This is a crucial issue for our economies’...