From the State of the Union, to the UN General Assembly

From the State of the Union, to the UN General Assembly

I write on my way to New York, for the UN General Assembly’s Ministerial week, and after an important session of the European Parliament in Strasbourg. Important both for the issues we worked on with the Members of Parliament, and for President Juncker’s State of the Union speech. It was a powerful and bold speech, touching upon the main foreign policy issues which the European Union continues to be engaged on: our work towards a European Union of security and defence; the Western Balkans’ path towards the EU; our leadership in the fight against climate change and for a free and fair international trade; our investment in Africa’s development. Free&fair #trade, partnership with #Africa, EU #defence, EU perspective for Balkans, leadership on #ClimateChange A great #SOTEU @JunckerEU — Federica Mogherini (@FedericaMog) 13 settembre 2017 .@JunckerEU “L’Europe ne progresse que quand elle fait preuve d’audace”: solidarité, unité, droits, égalité #EUdacityOfHope #SOTEU — Federica Mogherini (@FedericaMog) 13 settembre 2017 On many of these issues I worked during my three days at the European Parliament. On Tuesday I was on the floor of the House to discuss migration: I talked about the work we are doing and the results we are starting to achieve – in particular to save human lives, to foster growth in Africa and to improve the living conditions of migrants along the route, in Libya and in the Sahel (here is my speech and my reply to parliamentarians). In Strasbourg we also worked on North Korea, in a week marked by yet another provocation by Pyongyang (here is my statement on the latest launch of a ballistic missile) and after the new Resolution approved unanimously by the UN...
UN General Assembly, day 5: setbacks and successes

UN General Assembly, day 5: setbacks and successes

I write at the end of a very intense week at the United Nations, which I concluded yesterday in New York presenting the European Union’s Global Strategy at Columbia University (here is the video of my speech there). During these days in New York we had moments of gratification, and moments of deep frustration. In just a few hours, I could measure the distance between the successes and the setbacks of multilateral diplomacy. On Thursday, for instance, I chaired the ministerial meeting with the seven countries who reached last year’s deal on Iran’s nuclear program. Together with Javad Zarif, John Kerry, Sergei Lavrov and the ministers of China, Germany, France and Great Britain, we concurred that the implementation of the deal is well on track, as verified by the IAEA in three successive reports (here is the press conference at the end of the meeting). It is the sign not only that diplomacy works, but also that it can produce results that stand the test of time. Then, just minutes later, together with the same ministers and with others, we went through one of the most frustrating and sad pages of our work on Syria: the International Syria Support Group’s meeting couldn’t find an agreement on a cessation of hostilities. The Iran deal taught us something: even the most difficult goals can be reached through determination and perseverance. So, even in the toughest moments, our work goes on – and today I’m in Boston to search new pathways, for Syria and for the other regional conflicts, together with Kerry and the other ministers of the “Quint” (Germany, France, Britain and Italy). Our work goes on, with unity...
UN General Assembly, day 4: between Syria and Palestine, Afghanistan and the Balkans

UN General Assembly, day 4: between Syria and Palestine, Afghanistan and the Balkans

I write after another full day at the United Nations, in a General Assembly that is dealing with the great global issue of migrants and refugees, while working to address the crises that surround Europe. Starting with Syria. Today another meeting of the International Syria Support Group is in the agenda, and yesterday we worked to prepare the event. I spoke at length about Syria with the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergei Lavrov (here is my statement on the meeting), and with the Iranian Foreign Minister, Javad Zarif. With him I also prepared the ministerial meeting I will chair today, to take stock of the implementation of the nuclear deal we reached a year ago together with the US, Russia, China, France, Great Britain and Germany (here is the statement). The most ancient outstanding issue of the Middle East, the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians, was at the centre of a long meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. In the coming days we will gather the Middle East Quartet – where the European Union sits together with the United Nations, the United States and Russia – to shake life back into the two-State perspective, and to encourage concrete steps in this direction. Then Afghanistan, which is still struggling to find stability after decades of war. Afghanistan will be the focus of a big conference we are organising in Brussels in the first days of October: this is what I discussed yesterday with Foreign Minister Salahuddin Rabbani. But the UN General Assembly is also the opportunity to tackle great global issues – such as the fight against terrorism and radicalisation, which we discussed at the...